20/03/2017

Studi compiuti da Jack Vanderwyk

Statistiche 

The Top Ten producers:  
1. Sandylands Mark (1965) 
2. Kupros Master Mariner (1983) 
3. Sandylands Tandy (1961) 
4. Lindall Mastercraft (1980) 
5. Charway Ballywillwill (1978) 
6. Sandylands Rip Van Winkle (1980) 
7. Ingleston Ben (1926) 
8. Follytower Merrybrook Black Stormer (1969) 
9. Sandylands Tweed of Blaircourt (1958) 
10. Fabracken Comedy Star (1979) 

Ho estrapolato questo testo per rimarcare come sia possibile che il caso “Labrador a pelo lungo” sia ancora presente nelle linee di sangue, Sandylands Mark e Lindall Mastercraft, due cani entro i primi quattro, erano quasi certamente (senza test del dna non posso avere la certezza) portatori della variante che fa nascere i pelo lungo.

Storia dei Chocolate/Marrone 

 

Studying the pedigrees of chocolate Labrador Retrievers, you often wonder where the chocs are coming from. All of a sudden they are there, out of the blue. I studied the files in the LabradorNet database, which contains the pedigrees of more than 90,000 Labradors, and came to the conclusion that there are roughly 8 routes to the origin of chocolate Labs.
One of the reasons that you’ll find no chocolate Labs in the older files, is that they weren’t in fashion for many decades, so they just weren’t registered. However, the blacks and the yellows carrying the choc gene kept reproducing, and that’s why we’re able to trace them all the way back to the late 1800s.
According to the studbook of Buccleuch Kennels, the chocolates in that kennel came through FTW Peter of Faskally (1908). However, Peter of Faskally was a descendant of Buccleuch Avon (1885).
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Buccleuch Avon
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Peter of Faskally
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The Earl of Feversham had some typical specimen of chocolates, his Nawton Pruna (who produced yellow offspring) doing well at field trials in the years preceding the First World War.
One of the chief supporters of chocolates was the Hon. Lady Ward of Chiltonfoliat, near Hungerford, the dogs from her kennel being very typical with particularly good tails and coats. Her chocolate bitch FTW Darry of Chiltonfoliat (Braeroy Darkie) (1930) was sired by an unregistered chocolate dog called Jimmy, while her dam descended from the chocolate Flatcoat Clyde (see further down).
Mr. J.G. Severn of Tibshelf Kennels wrote: “My first experience of the chocolate Labradors was in February, 1938, when I visited Dr. Montgomery of Sutton Ashfield, about three miles from Tibshelf. We had mated his black bitch Shelagh of Brasidonia to my black dog Danilo of Tibshelf. Result: 4 blacks, 2 chocolate dogs, 1 cream bitch. I later bought Shelagh and mated her again to Danilo. Result just the same.”
Miss Wills of Metesford Kennels produced several chocolates in the late 1940s, early 1950s, but their descendence is not known.Further more we should keep in mind that there are a lot of missing links in our database, and sometimes the reasons for this are rather obvious. I found 21 interbred or fullbred Flatcoats or Chesapeake Bay retrievers in our Labrador retriever database, all born in the U.K. between 1914 and 1933. Of all the 21 interbred or fullbred Flatcoats or Chesapeake Bay retrievers, most of them being Field Trial champions, we could only track the ancestors for more than two generations of two dogs. The information about the ancestors of the other 19 interbred dogs was simply removed from the files in the 1930s. It seems that some well known Labrador breeders didn’t want the public to know that their succesful dogs were partly the offspring of interbred dogs. Two well known Chesapeake Bay retrievers were a dog called Jolly, who sired the male Labrador retriever Jolly Sam, born before 1933, and the bitch Corydalys, who was the dam of the female Labrador retriever Micklefield Juno, born before 1925. Clyde, born before 1923, was the “liver” (chocolate) Flatcoat retriever who sired the male yellow Labrador FTW Folkingham Bexter (1925), who in turn sired the yellow bitch FTW Limekiln Rhoda (1927). She and the yellow dog FTW Golden Morn (1926) had a litter that was registered as “half Golden Retriever and half Labradors”. The separation was by coat length, because all puppies were yellow. Apparently the third generation showed some traits of the original breed involved.
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The chocolate Labrador may not have been very popular prior to the 1960s, but they were mentioned as early as 1927, in The Book of Dogs, published by the National Geographic Society in 1927: “This Labrador dog, crossed probably with the English setter, and perhaps with other breeds, produced the Retriever, which may be either black or liver-brown.” (The yellow Labrador was organized in The Yellow Labrador Retriever Club, in 1924.) 

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Sandylands Mark
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 Route 1 (version 1): Morningtown Tobla (f, choc, < 1976) – Brentville Ebony (f, black, <1974)- Knavery Mistress Meg (f, black < 1972) – Sandylands Mark (m, black, 1965) – Reanacre Mallardhurn Thunder (m, black, 1960) – Mallardhurn Pat (f, yellow, < 1958) – Poppleton Lieutenant (m, yellow, 1949) – Poppleton Golden Sunray (f, yellow, < 1947) – Poppleton Golden Major (m, yellow, < 1940) – Poppleton Black Lancer (m, black, 1934) – Haylers Danilo (m, black < 1932) – Banchory Danilo (m, black, 1923) – Banchory Bolo (m, black, 1915) – Scandal of Glynn (m, black, < 1913) – Shelag of Glynn (f, black, < 1911) – Shelag (f, colour unknown, < 1909) – Munden Sentry (m, black, 1900) – Munden Sixty (m, black, 1897) – Buccleuch Nith (m, black, 1891) – Buccleuch Avon (m, black, 1885) – Malmesbury Tramp (m, black, 1878).
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Reanacre Mallardhurn Thunder
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Route 1 (version 2): Morningtown Tobla (f, choc, < 1976) – Brentville Ebony (f, black, <1974)- Knavery Mistress Meg (f, black < 1972) – Sandylands Mark (m, black, 1965) – Reanacre Mallardhurn Thunder (m, black, 1960) – Mallardhurn Pat (f, yellow, < 1958) – Poppleton Lieutenant (m, yellow, 1949) – Poppleton Golden Sunray (f, yellow, < 1947) – Poppleton Golden Major (m, yellow, < 1940) – Poppleton Black Lancer (m, black, 1934) – Haylers Danilo (m, black < 1932) – Boris de Main (f, yellow, < 1930), child of: Sceptre (m, colour unknown, not registered, < 1928) and Countess (f, colour unknown, not registered, < 1928). However, Buccleuch Avon, born in 1885, so almost 40 years before, is known to have produced some chocolate offspring, so it’s more likely that either his sire Malmesbury Tramp, or his dam Malmesbury June (f, black, 1880), or both, already carried the chocolate gene.
Follytower Merrybrook Black Stormer
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Route 2: Follytower Merrybrook Black Stormer (m, black, 1969) – Sandylands Tandy (m, yellow, 1961) – Sandylands Shadow (f, black, 1959) – Diant Pride (f, yellow, < 1957) – Poppleton Lieutenant (m, yellow, 1949) – Poppleton Golden Sunray (f, yellow, < 1947) – Poppleton Golden Major (m, yellow, < 1940) – Poppleton Black Lancer (m, black, 1934) – Haylers Danilo (m, black < 1932) – Banchory Danilo (m, black, 1923) – Banchory Bolo (m, black, 1915) – Scandal of Glynn (m, black, < 1913) – Shelag of Glynn (f, black, < 1911) – Shelag (f, colour unknown, < 1909) – Munden Sentry (m, black, 1900) – Munden Sixty (m, black, 1897) – Buccleuch Nith (m, black, 1891) – Buccleuch Avon (m, black, 1885) – Malmesbury Tramp (m, black, 1878).
Fabracken Comedy Star
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Route 3: Fabracken Comedy Star (m, black, 1979) – Martin of Mardas (m, black, 1975) – Ballyduff Marketeer (m, black, 1974) – Sandylands Mark (m, black, 1965) – Reanacre Mallardhurn Thunder (m, black, 1960) – Mallardhurn Pat (f, yellow, < 1958) – Poppleton Lieutenant (m, yellow, 1949) – Poppleton Golden Sunray (f, yellow, < 1947) – Poppleton Golden Major (m, yellow, < 1940) – Poppleton Black Lancer (m, black, 1934) – Haylers Danilo (m, black < 1932) – Banchory Danilo (m, black, 1923) – Banchory Bolo (m, black, 1915) – Scandal of Glynn (m, black, < 1913) – Shelag of Glynn (f, black, < 1911) – Shelag (f, colour unknown, < 1909) – Munden Sentry (m, black, 1900) – Munden Sixty (m, black, 1897) – Buccleuch Nith (m, black, 1891) – Buccleuch Avon (m, black, 1885) – Malmesbury Tramp (m, black, 1878).
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Martin of Mardas
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Route 4: Olivia of Blaircourt (f, black, < 1954) – Lawrie of Blaircourt (m, black, < 1952) – Fiona of Blaircourt (f, black, < 1950) – Treesholme Thunder (m, black, < 1948) – Triumph of Treesholme (m, yellow, < 1946) – Poppleton Golden Sherry (f, yellow, < 1944) – Poppleton Golden Gleam (f, yellow, < 1942) – Poppleton Golden Major (m, yellow, < 1940) – Poppleton Black Lancer (m, black, 1934) – Haylers Danilo (m, black < 1932) – Banchory Danilo (m, black, 1923) – Banchory Bolo (m, black, 1915) – Scandal of Glynn (m, black, < 1913) – Shelag of Glynn (f, black, < 1911) – Shelag (f, colour unknown, < 1909) – Munden Sentry (m, black, 1900) – Munden Sixty (m, black, 1897) – Buccleuch Nith (m, black, 1891) – Buccleuch Avon (m, black, 1885) – Malmesbury Tramp (m, black, 1878).


Sandylands Tweed of Blaircourt
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Route 5: Pride of Craigavon (m, chocolate, < 1974) – Taffy of Keithray (m, black, 1965) – Sandylands Tweed of Blaircourt (m, black, 1958) – Ruler of Blaircourt (m, black, 1956) – Olivia of Blaircourt (f, black, < 1954) – Lawrie of Blaircourt (m, black, < 1952) – Fiona of Blaircourt (f, black, < 1950) – Treesholme Thunder (m, black, < 1948) – Triumph of Treesholme (m, yellow, < 1946) – Poppleton Golden Sherry (f, yellow, < 1944) – Poppleton Golden Gleam (f, yellow, < 1942) – Poppleton Golden Major (m, yellow, < 1940) – Poppleton Black Lancer (m, black, 1934) – Haylers Danilo (m, black < 1932) – Banchory Danilo (m, black, 1923) – Banchory Bolo (m, black, 1915) – Scandal of Glynn (m, black, < 1913) – Shelag of Glynn (f, black, < 1911) – Shelag (f, colour unknown, < 1909) – Munden Sentry (m, black, 1900) – Munden Sixty (m, black, 1897) – Buccleuch Nith (m, black, 1891) – Buccleuch Avon (m, black, 1885) – Malmesbury Tramp (m, black, 1878).

Route 6: Cookridge Oscar (m, chocolate, < 1960) – Bickerton Salmon Prince (m, yellow, < 1958) – Blondie of Gloamin (f, yellow, < 1956) – Raider of Gloamin (m, colour unknown, < 1954) – Marquis of Gloamin (m, yellow, < 1944) – Poppleton Golden Major (m, yellow, < 1940) – Poppleton Black Lancer (m, black, 1934) – Haylers Danilo (m, black < 1932) – Banchory Danilo (m, black, 1923) – Banchory Bolo (m, black, 1915) – Scandal of Glynn (m, black, < 1913) – Shelag of Glynn (f, black, < 1911) – Shelag (f, colour unknown, < 1909) – Munden Sentry (m, black, 1900) – Munden Sixty (m, black, 1897) – Buccleuch Nith (m, black, 1891) – Buccleuch Avon (m, black, 1885) – Malmesbury Tramp (m, black, 1878).

Route 7: Chocolate Lady (f, chocolate, < 1954) – Harehope Bliss (m, black, 1936) – Weston Bunty (f, black, < 1934) – Adderley Tyke (m, black, 1929) – Adderley Trim (f, black, 1927) – Beningbrough Tanco (m, black, 1924) – Banchory Corbie (m, black, 1921) – Banchory Bolo (m, black, 1915) – Scandal of Glynn (m, black, < 1913) – Shelag of Glynn (f, black, < 1911) – Shelag (f, colour unknown, < 1909) – Munden Sentry (m, black, 1900) – Munden Sixty (m, black, 1897) – Buccleuch Nith (m, black, 1891) – Buccleuch Avon (m, black, 1885) – Malmesbury Tramp (m, black, 1878).
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Munden Sentry
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Route 8: Hiwood Mike (m, black, 1935), via Pettistree Dan (m, black, 1934) – Quest of Wilbury (f, black, 1930) – Muntham Raven (f, black, 1924) – Banchory Corbie (m, black, 1921) – Banchory Bolo (m, black, 1915) – Scandal of Glynn (m, black, < 1913) – Shelag of Glynn (f, black, < 1911) – Shelag (f, colour unknown, < 1909) – Munden Sentry (m, black, 1900) – Munden Sixty (m, black, 1897) – Buccleuch Nith (m, black, 1891) – Buccleuch Avon (m, black, 1885) – Malmesbury Tramp (m, black, 1878),
AND via Pettistree Poppet (f, colour unknown, < 1933) – Cransford Flapper (f, colour unknown, < 1931) – Peter of Bircham (m, colour unknown, < 1930) – Banchory Danilo (m, black, 1923) – Banchory Bolo (m, black, 1915) – Scandal of Glynn (m, black, < 1913) – Shelag of Glynn (f, black, < 1911) – Shelag (f, colour unknown, < 1909) – Munden Sentry (m, black, 1900) – Munden Sixty (m, black, 1897) – Buccleuch Nith (m, black, 1891) – Buccleuch Avon (m, black, 1885) – Malmesbury Tramp (m, black, 1878).

I researched some 30 well known chocolate Labrador Retrievers without any known chocolate anscestors, and their pedigrees all fit in with one (ore several) of the routes above. Please keep in mind that famous Labradors like Boothgates Headliner, Lindall Mollie Malone, Morningtown Stormette etc. all descend from Morningtown Tobla (route 1).

Aroscas Chocolate Surprise: route 1, via Sandylands Mark.
Bradking Cassandra: route 2, directly and via Ardmargha Mad Hatter and Sandylands Mark.
Brendale Brown Betty: route 2 and 5.
Brentwoods Sweet Molly Brown: route 2, via Mardas Brandlesholme Sam’s Song.
Captain Kirk of Rangeways: route 1 and 2.
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Castlemore Bramble
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Castlemore Bramble: route 1 via Sandylands Mark, route 5 via Pride of Craigavon.
Charway Mattie Brown: route 3.
Charway Sally Brown: route 2.
Chocolate Lady: route 7, via Harehope Bliss.
Cookridge Oscar: route 6, via Bickerton Salmon Price.
Cookridge Tango: route 5, via Sandylands Tweed of Blaircourt.
Could Be’s Chestnut Wrangler: route 4, via Could Be’s Rusty Rock, Could Be’s Haven Rock, Indian Valley Rob Roy, Bart of Blaircourt and Rush of Blaircourt.
Follytower Brownthorn: route 2, via Charway Blackthorn of Follytower.

Gunfield’s Super Charger: route 8, via Shamrock Acres Super Drive, Super Chief, Paha Sapa Chief  II, Freehaven Muscles, Grangemead Sharon.
Gunotter’s Chocolate Nip: route 5, via Harris Tweed of Ide and Sandylands Tweed of Blaircourt.
Haverhill’s Brown Belle: route 1, via Dickendall Flip Flop, Sandylands Midas and Reanacre Mallardhurn Thunder.
Ironwood Cocoa Mocha: route 8, via Del Tone Colvin, Cork of Oakwood Lane, Coastal Charger of Deer Creek, Little Pierre of Deer Creek.
Lawnwoods Chocolate Fudge: directly via route 2, and route 1 via Lawnwoods Tapestry and Reanacre Mallardhurn Thunder.

Lawnwoods Hot Chocolate
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Lawnwoods Hot Chocolate: route 2.
Lenches Chocolate Liquor: Route 1 via Lasgarn Ludovic and Sandylands Mark.
Loughderg Fiona: route 4, via Ruler of Blaircourt.
Marbra Leprechaun: route 2.
Pride of Craigavon: route 5.
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Pumerang Connection With Stormley: route 2, the easy way via Harrop Black Jack, or take the detour via Stormley Lynx with Pumerang, Ravenshall Charmer at Stormley, Clayford Music At Midnight At Stormley, Lawnwoods Midnight Folly and Lawnwoods Fandango.
Roydwood Rowntree at Ravenshall: route 1 and 2, via Keithray Lucinda, Contessa of Keithray & Sandylands Tandy.
Simandem Sam Browne of Balrion: route 2, via Charway Blackthorn of Follytower.
Sorbus Brown Jay: route 5, via Alvgardens Sam, Alvgardens Jet, Alvgardens Flap, Sandylands Twanah and Sandylands Tweed of Blaircourt.
Tracers Sweet Georgia Brown: route 2, via Follytower Chevalier of Ranfurly and Follytower Augusta.
Waltham Galaxy of Condor: route 1, via Jayncourt Stormer and Sandylands Mark.
Whisky Creek Brown Buina: route 4, via Indian Valley Raed Wulf & Bart of Blaircourt.

Williston Brown Smith: route 1, via Sebastian of Anderscroft, Sandylands Midas and Reanacre Mallardhurn Thunder.

I’m pretty sure that at least 99% of all chocolate Labradors can be categorized using one of the 8 routes above.

 


Wetherlam Nutcracker, ancestor of most of my chocs.
 
 
Several routes can be taken to track the origin of chocolate Labs
 

 

 Read this story in Italian
.Jack Vanderwyk,
LabradorNet
May 5, 2003
http://labradornet.com
Email: info@labradornet.com
 

LabradorNet owner Jack Vanderwyk – 
expert on Labrador Retrievers
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From Wikipedia (search term “Labrador Retriever“): 
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Chocolate labradors
Jack Vanderwyk traces the origins of all Chocolate labradors listed on the LabradorNet database (some 34,000 labradors dogs of all shades) to eight original bloodlines. However the shade was not seen as a distinct colour until the 20th century; before then according to Vanderwyk, such dogs can be traced but were not registered. A degree of crossbreeding with Flatcoat or Chesapeake Bay retrievers was also documented in the early 20th century, prior to recognition. Chocolate labradors were also well established in the early 20th century at the kennels of the Earl of Feversham, and Lady Ward of Chiltonfoliat.The bloodlines as traced by Vanderwyk each lead back to three black labradors in the 1880s—Buccleuch Avon (m), and his sire and dam, Malmesbury Tramp (m), and Malmesbury June (f). Morningtown Tobla is also named as an important intermediary, and according to the studbook of Buccleuch Kennels, the chocolates in that kennel came through FTW Peter of Faskally (1908)..
In German: 
Jack Vanderwyk verfolgt den Ursprung der schokoladebraunen Labradore die in der LabradorNet Datenbank (circa 34.000 Labradore aller Farben) zurück auf acht ursprüngliche Stammbäume. Wie dem auch sei, die Farbnuance wurde nicht als eigenständige Farbe angesehen, bis ins 20. Jahrhundert hinein. Vor dieser Zeit, laut Vanderwyk, können diese Tiere zwar zurückverfolgt werden, sie waren aber nicht registriert. Ein gewisser Grad an Kreuzungen mit Flat Coat Retriever und Chesapeak Bay Retriever Hunden wurde Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts dokumentiert, noch vor der Anerkennung. Schokoladenfarbige Labrador Retriever waren in den Zuchten vom Earl of Feversham und in der Zucht von Lady Ward of Chiltonfoliat Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts auch stark vertreten.Der Stammbäume die von Vanderwyk zurückverfolgt wurden führen zu drei schwarzen Labradoren während den 1880er Jahren: Buccleuch Avon (männlich) und die von ihm gezeugten Malmesbury Tramp (männlich) und Malmesbury June (weiblich). Momingtown Tobla wird auch als wichtiger Bestandteil der Entwicklung der schokoladenbraun farbigen Labradore vom Stammbuch des Buccleuch Kennels genannt, die braunen Tiere dieses Zuchtverbandes kamen von Peter of Faskally (1908).
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Storia dei cross per aumentare il patrimonio genetico

 

 

GENETIC DEFECTS AND BREEDING PRACTICES IN THE LABRADOR RETRIEVER
 
 
Labrador Typecasting
(How to typify your Labradors)
By Jack Vanderwyk
 
 

 

 

What are we doing to our dogs, and why?
(And what about dwarfism?)
Read the article
 
Interbred Dogs in the History of the Labrador Retriever
by Jack Vanderwyk
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Part of a handwritten pedigree of the Duke of Buccleuch, from August 1894
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Introduction
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Most of the information about U.K. interbred Labradors has been removed from the official registration files. Obviously one didn’t want the public to know that one’s high ranking field champions’ bloodlines were mixed with those of Flatcoat Retrievers, Chesapeake Bay Retrievers and Golden Retrievers. How silly, and how wrong one was.  
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How lucky we are that some responsible breeders kept their own studbooks and didn’t want to cooperate with the official registrars who fiddled their books.   
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I think it is the duty of the breed clubs to repair, maintain and improve the Labrador databases with all possible means, and publish these databases on the internet, free for everyone to use. Because the more we know about our dogs, the more we are able to breed wisely and responsibly. 
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In breeding it’s important to know the ancestors of our breeding stock. Certain traits, coming fromFlatcoats, may be desired in working Labradors, but may not be the right background for family dogs. More serious are certain genetic diseases, like the Ectopic Ureter Defect, a polygenetic condition in the Golden Retriever which at some point entered the Labrador Retriever breed. We need all information we can get, to support the scientists who try very hard to provide us with reliable DNA tests. 
So, breed clubs and kennel clubs: open your files, digitalise the information, publish it on the internet and stop pretending the Labrador has been pure bred ever since 1874.     
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Interbred Retriever History
(taken from page 129 of 1949 Stud Book Reprint – C Mackay Sanderson)Of what may be termed the minor retriever groups, the record of interbreds during the last period, conceding for limited numerical representation, must be regarded as extremely satisfactory.While only about 30 were prominently concerned with working competition, from this section there emerged six  F.T. Ch. and two actual winners of the Championship Stake, with another placed 3rd in the classic. Those gaining the working qualification were F.T.Ch. Flashy, Dazzle, Stourhead Nero, Haulstone Bob, Black Druce, Greatford Quickstep. Eight breeding combinations were represented in the records of the period.Officially designated as a cross between any two of the pure bred varieties, analysis of records indicates that the Labrador dog and interbred bitch took precedence in public favour, also proving the most successful in competition.Five of the F.T.Ch. came under this heading and more than half the leading trial winners. A survey of statistics brings out the following analysis under the approved breeding combinations: – Labrador dog and interbred bitch (15), Golden dog and interbred bitch (5), interbred dog and Flat-coat bitch (2), Labrador dog and Flat-coat bitch (2), Yellow Labrador dog and Golden bitch (2), Flat-coat dog and interbred bitch (2).The kennels prominently concerned with this phase of competition included those owned by the following: – The late Mr C Alington, The late Mr J Eccles, Sir Henry Hoare, Sir W J Smith Marriotts, Mr Wood Homer, Mr H Peacock. 

The late Mr C Alington was undoubtedly the pioneer in this phase of development and it was largely due to his energy and enterprise that the group caught widespread recognition. Five stakes were won by two noted inmates of his kennel in Field Trial Championships, Flashy and Dazzle, which had the distinction of winning the Championship Stake in successive years, highlights of the period as far as the higher sphere of competition is concerned. Both were by the Labrador Start, Flashy being ex the interbred bitch Jubilee Daisy and Dazzle ex Duchess which was within a like province. 

Flashy won the Championship Stake in 1921, being also first open event at the Kennel Club Meeting and 3rd in the Nomination Stake of the International Gun Dog League. The record of Dazzle was even more impressive, towering over all opposition over two seasons, his score sheet featuring 1st Nomination Stake, International Gun Dog League in 1921 and, in addition to victory in the Championship Stake the following year, Dazzle won the Open Stake of the Kennel Club and was 2nd in the National Stake. In 1920 a Scottish-owned dog in Mr McDouall’s Logan Darkie advertised merits of the group in emphatic fashion, winning the All-aged Stake of the Kennel Club and being 3rd in the Championship Event. Logan Darkie was by the Labrador Logan Lambert ex an interbred bitch, Logan Juno. 

The Dorset trials can be pointed to as a happy hunting ground of the group, Mr Wood Homer, in particular, enjoying a remarkable run of success at this meeting with interbreds.
This was initiated in 1922 by Bardolf John, a produce of the Labrador dog – interbred bitch combination which was 2nd in the All-aged Stake. In 1934 Mr Wood Homer introduced a worker of real distinction in Black Druce, by Bardolph John (Labrador), ex Dinah (interbred).
This bitch had a triumphant career at the Dorset meeting, winning the All-aged Stake thrice, and being once 2nd in 4 years, taking the title in 1936, during which season she also won at the Western Counties.

In 1924 Bardolf Doll, from the same kennel, was 2nd in the All-aged Stake at the Dorset meeting and her descent continued the successful penetration. Down House Bob, and Bardolf Carmen, son and daughter, were bracketed 3rd equal in the Puppy Stake in 1924, Down House Bob being 3rd in All-aged, 1925. Bardolf Betty, another daughter of Bardolf Doll, was placed 2nd in the Puppy Stake in 1923. The initial penetration by the group at the Dorset fixture was registered by Sir W J Smith Marriott’s Down House Pilot, a product of a Labrador- Flat-coat combination – which headed the field in the All-aged Stake in 1921.

Four years later Down House Bob, similarly owned, was 3rd Equal in the Puppy Stake and placed 3rd All-Aged in 1925. Early in the period placings at the Cheshire fixture gave impetus to the fortunes of the group. In 1921 Bibby and Byke emerged, owned respectively by The Late Mr P Barrett and Mr R E Birch. Apart from her competitive career, Bibby, built up an unassailable reputation as a matron, her stock enjoying amazing success as trial performers.
Byke was 2nd in the Puppy event at the County Meeting in the year named. The following year this event was won by another of the group in Mr Shaw’s Ouida of Hale Barnes, which owned an interbred dam and Labrador sire. Bibby was by an interbred sire, ex Flat-coat dam.

The kennel of the late Mr J Eccles supplied many colourful pages to history, being developed on astute lines with F.T.Ch. Haulstone Bob, a central figure. Initial interest in this case centres round the mating of the Golden Champion Haulstone Dan to Haulstone Jenny, an interbred bitch. Haulstone Jenny was a daughter of the Yellow Labrador F.T.Ch. Haylers Defender, ex Haulstone Rusty a Golden. From the Haulstone Dan – Haulstone Jenny combination there resulted Haulstone Joker and Jean of Lintrathen, neither of which, however, soared above the certificated division.

An auspicious juncture was reached when Haulstone Jenny was mated to the Golden, Call Boy of Woolley, as from this F.T.Ch. Haulstone Bob and Lizzie, also Pat of Lintrathen resulted. Haulstone Bob had a brilliant trial career extending over five seasons, during which he won 3 Open Stakes, 1 Non-Winner’s Event, scored two 2nd, five 3rds, and twice gained diplomas in the Championship Stake. He won the National Stake in 1932, being 2nd in the same event in 1934, scoring victories in the Open events at the Cheshire and Scottish Gun Dog Association in 1935. 

Pat of Lintrathen scored two 2nds in the course of his career, Lizzie being placed 3rd on one occasion. Subsequently, Haulstone Jean, a sister of Haulstone Jenny, was mated to the Golden Ch. Haulstone Marker, Haulstone Janet winner of two 2nds and one 3rd resulting. F.T.Ch. Haulstone Larry, winner of the 1937 Championship Stake was two generations removed from the Haulstone Marker – Lizzie combination. A final note as far as this Kennel is concerned can surround Haulstone Jock, a winner during season 1937, which was by the Yellow Labrador Braeroy Rab ex Haulstone Linnet, a Golden.

Dr Stanton’s kennel supplied an auspicious instance where the Yellow Labrador sire and Golden dam combination yielded effective results. Folkingham Budge, a product of this combination, was 3rd at the Eastern Counties in 1923. In 1925 Folkingham Blanco, by Invergarry Sam, a Yellow Labrador, ex Folkingham Budge, was 2nd at the same fixture.

The ascent of Sir Henry Hoare to the ranks of interbred active participants marked another turning point to higher achievement. Following the emergence of Stourhead Graceful in 1925, this kennel took a tight grip on prosperity, several of its inmates gaining permanent fame. Stourhead Graceful was by a Flat-coat sire in Esmonian, ex the Labrador Stourhead Satan, heading the field in the Non-Winners Stake at the Dorset Trials in 1924 and being 2nd Open 1927. One of the star performers of the period emerged from this kennel in 1926 in F.T.Ch. Stourhead Nero, a son of Stourhead Satan, by Never, a Labrador. Stourhead Nero’s ascent to fame was immediate, being placed 2nd in both stakes at the Dorset fixture in his first season and, over 4 years, he won the All-aged Stake twice, being placed 2nd on two other occasions, fitting testimony to both capacity and consistency. Stourhead Nero’s score sheet also included 3rd Western Counties and he took the title in this third season.

The 1927 Dorset meeting was historic with the group holding all opposition effectively in subjection, registering two 1sts and two 2nds in the two stakes embodied in the card. The meeting brought to light a trial contestant of high merit in The Late Sir G Thursby’s Bramshaw Gloss, the sire of which was a noted Labrador Dual Championship Banchory Sunspeck, her dam being Twinkle of Faskally, a daughter of Start. On her initial appearance, Bramshaw Gloss won the Non-Winners event and was 2nd Equal Open Stake. 

Mr B Yeowards Stanthorne Serula, by a Labrador sire, ex a cross-bred dam, graduated at the Cheshire trials in 1927, winning the All-aged event at this fixture in 1929 and was 2nd at the West Midland in 1930. 

Eight years later Mr H Peacock brought out a daughter of Stanthorne Serula, in Greatford Quickstep, by the Labrador Twister. Greatford Quickstep qualified in her second season, winning Open Stakes at the Scottish Field Trials Association and Midland Counties. 

Three trial contestants under this heading also captured prominence at the meetings of the Ulster Gundog League. In 1923 The Hon. H Mulholland’s Woodspeen Judy, by a Labrador sire, ex a Flat-coat dam, was placed 3rd. The same position was filled by another in Mr W Lamont’s Kirkmichael Don in 1924. 

Nine years later Mr P Taylor’s Barrock Fin, by a cross-bred sire, ex a Flat-coat bitch, was placed 3rd. The prominence demanded must also be accorded three performances at Branch Meetings of the Utility Gundog Society.

Mr L Wooton’s Nation, a product of the Labrador sire Flat-coat dam combination, won at the Wilts. Branch and was 3rd Cup Finals in 1933. At the Hants. Branch, victories in successive years – 1924-1925 – were registered by two under a similar heading in Mr G Pile’s Peatress, and Mr J Buckingham’s Ben of Ridge. In 1934 Captain H F H Hardy’s Melange Jean, by the Golden Yellow Boy, ex Jane Petch, a cross-bred, was 3rd at the Eastern Counties.
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Inter-Bred retriever field trial champions: 
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Dazzle – Sire, Start (Lab.); dam, Duchess (I.B.); owner, C. Alington; breeder, C. Tunnard.
Flashy – Sire, Start (Lab.); dam, Jubilee Daisy (I.B.); owner, C. Alington; breeder, Capt. Duberley. 
Stourhead Nero – Sire, Never (Lab.); dam, Stourhead Satan (I.B.); owner, Sir H. Hoare; breeder, Owner. 
Haulston Bob – Sire, Call Boy of Woolley (Golden); dam, Haulston Jenny (I.B.); owner, J. Eccles; breeder, Owner. 
Black Druce – Sire, Bardolf John (Lab.); dam, Dinah (I.B.); owner, G. Wood Homer; breeder, Mr Miller. 
Greatford Quickstep – Sire, Twist (Lab.); dam, Stanthorne Serula (I.B.); owner, H. Peacock; breeder, H. White. 

Registrazioni in Uk in anni passati

The Shameful Years of Labrador Registration
in the United Kingdom
by Jack Vanderwyk
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This is the story of 21 interbred Labradors from the United Kingdom. Actually it is only a small part of their story, because most of it has been removed from the official registration files. Obviously one didn’t want the public to know that one’s high ranking field champions’ bloodlines were mixed with those of Flatcoat Retrievers, Chesapeake Bay Retrievers and Golden Retrievers. How silly, and how wrong one was. 
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Daffy, Dazzle, Flap, Graceful Susan, Gypsum Pol Roger, Jolly Sam, Jubilee Daisy, Kirkmichael Don, Mat, Micklefield Juno, Ouida of Hale Barnes, Stourhead Nero and Woodspeen Judy – your story is short and no one knows who you are. You produced many champions, and for one or two generations they were registered, but we don’t know what happened to their offspring after 1936, and how much of them we could find back in our present Labradors if we had access to the original files. 
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It looks like some British registrars of the 1920s and 1930s were inspired by their contemporary Joseph Stalin — if there’s something in history that you might find embarrassing, you just tear out the pages of the history textbooks, and see – it never happened!  
How lucky we are that some responsible breeders kept their own studbooks and didn’t want to cooperate with the official registrars who fiddled their books. The pedigree of Buccleuch Virginia, for instance, gives us the opportunity to see what the official registrars left out, and some Labradors were brought to the United States – with their pedigrees – before the big clearout started. 
So despite the fact that the registration was obscured, and even if it’s only a top of the iceberg, we still have some interesting descendants to look at, like Stourhead Gilda’s, Horton Flo’s, and Fairgirth Bell’s. 
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The (usually self-proclaimed) authorities of the Labrador world may in their days have done great things for the breed in general, but they also deprived us from a reliable database. I’m not just talking about removing the connections with other breeds. Once you start fiddling the books – because of pride, money, friendship, whatever – the sky is the limit. However, with over a hundred diseases and defects common in the Labrador Retriever, Labrador breeders have only the past to learn from, and when this past is blurred by unrecorded or misleading facts, it is difficult to tell which breeding practices or theories are right or wrong. Dogs may be excluded from breeding wrongfully – which effects the breed in general – and dogs that should be excluded (if we only knew the facts) are not – which probably effects the breed even more. 
I think it is the duty of the breed clubs to repair, maintain and improve the Labrador databases with all possible means, and publish these databases on the internet, free for everyone to use. Because the more we know about our dogs, the more we are able to breed wisely and responsibly.
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Analyzing the files
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Pedigree of FTW Banchory Polish (1920). Father is interbred Shine, grandfather is interbred Mat. 
No descendants of FTW Banchory Polish registered. 
Pedigree of FTW Dunrainey Druid (1932). Grandfather is interbred Daffy, great-grandfather is interbred Kirkmichael Don. 
No descendants of FTW Dunrainey Druid registered. 
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Pedigree of GB FT CH Flashy (1930). Mother is interbred Jubilee Daisy. 
No descendants of GB FT CH Flashy registered. 
      

 

Pedigree of FTW Gilstair Sandy (1934). Grandfather is interbred Gypsum Pol Roger. 
No descendants of FTW Gilstair Sandy registered. 
      

 

Pedigree of FTW Hard Frost (1923). Grandfather is interbred Shine, great-grandfather is interbred Mat. 
No descendants of FTW Hard Frost registered. 
      

 

Pedigree of FTW Langbourne Jenny (1936). Grandfather is interbred Stourhead Nero, great-grandfather is interbred Stourhead Satan. 
No descendants of FTW Langbourne Jenny registered. 
      

 

Pedigree of FTW Plover (1935). Mother is interbred Gracious Lady, grandmother is interbred Graceful Susan. 
No descendants of FTW Plover registered. 
      

 

Pedigree of FTW Warden Sprinkle (1935). Father is interbred Jolly Sam, grandfather is Chesapeake Bay Retriever Jolly. 
No descendants of FTW Warden Sprinkle registered. 
      

 

Pedigree of FTW Woodspeen Mona (1935). Mother is interbred Flap, grandmother is interbred Woodspeen Judy. 
No descendants of FTW Woodspeen Mona registered. 
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Surely there can be reasons why a promising dog doesn’t produce any offspring, but it is very unusual, and when this is happening to 90% of the dogs with interbred ancestors, something fishy is going on. Then you’re able to say there’s a pattern.
I suspect that between 1920 and 1940, with the knowledge and approval of the owners, Labradors with interbred ancestors were systematically removed from the registration files. One way to re-enter the registration files with a “clean sheet” and build on the bloodlines was to enter such a dog as “non registered”. His or her offspring would be registered, but the owner/breeder would be freed from the “tainted” past of such a dog. 
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This is the 6-generation pedigree of Itasca Sandy, an American Labrador from British descendants. Would it have been a British dog, then we probably wouldn’t know anything about Itasca Sandy’s offspring, because his great-great-grandfather was FTW Horton Maxim (1916), who’s father was interbred Horton Max, a son of the famous and influential Flatcoat Retriever CH Darenth, and who’s mother was the interbred Horton Flo. 
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In this pedigree of Cinderella of Garfield we move from 1929 to 1946. You will find Itasca Sandy on the bottom. 
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In this pedigree of Bigstone Taffy we move on another 23 years, to 1969. You will find Cinderella of Garfield on Royal of Garfield’s mother’s side. 
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26 years later we arrive at Honcho’s Karma Chameleon, and you’ll find Bigstone Taffy on Lookout Daisy’s Babe’s mother’s side. (Not hard to find a yellow bitch between all these blacks.)
If you study the names in the pedigree, you might already recognize some names from your own dog’s pedigree.
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With the pedigree of Lorken Frieda Run we finally arrived in the present time. Honcho’s Karma Chameleon can be found at the very bottom of the pedigree.
Now this is what you should be able to do: consulting the pedigrees of your Labradors, or those of the Labradors you are interested in. Databases should be trustworthy and as complete as possible. Thanks to the fact a Labrador was exported from the United Kingdom to the United States, we are able to track its roots all the way back to CH Darenth, a Flatcoat Retriever. And that’s the way it should be.
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Another pedigree we’re able to follow all the way back, thanks to the studbooks of the Dukes of Buccleuch. (See how it is a fine example of linebreeding back to Swinbrook Tan.)
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From the 1970s all the way back to the 1940s: in Swinbrook Tan’s pedigree we are looking for a bitch called Phillipine Diane, an ancestor of Cornbury Regent. 
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And with this pedigree we arrived in the 1920s. In Phillipine Dinah’s line we find the interbred bitch CCW Hornton Dora. But now we’re looking for a bitch called Danbury Faith, Pettistree Poppet’s grandmother, because she is the key to some other interbreds and a Flatcoat Retriever.
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In Cariboo of Langbourne’s line we find his interbred mother Stourhead Gilda, his interbred grandmother Stourhead Graceful, his interbred great-grandmother Stourhead Satan, and CCW Esmonian, a Flatcoat Retriever, his great-grandfather. 
Now we’ve come this far, why not take a tour via Lord Cairn’s Smut (1895) and go all the way back to the very beginning of the first registered Labrador Retrievers?
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From Buccleuch Virginia in 1996 to Buccleuch in 1885, and Malmesbury Sweep, Malmesbury Tramp and Malmesbury June, where it all started with.
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I hope I have made may case clear. Databases are important, now more than ever. We can make our databases accessible to everyone, we can build open databases with all kinds of important information, to breed even better and healthier Labrador Retrievers. 
Read George Padgett’s book “Control of Canine Genetic Diseases” before you start jump to conclusions. And also read his article about Open Disease Registry.  

 

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